What are motorcycle death, and injury statistics in states requiring helmet use, as compared to that of cars?

Any information on motorcycle statistics is helpful, same with cars, thanks!

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6 Responses to “What are motorcycle death, and injury statistics in states requiring helmet use, as compared to that of cars?”

  1. rockbase said:

    Fact #4: An unhelmeted motorcyclists is 40% more likely to incur a fatal head injury and 15% more likely to incur a non-fatal head injury than a helmeted motorcyclist when involved in a crash.
    Helmet use among fatally injured motorcyclists below 50 percent

    More motorcyclist fatalities are occurring on rural roads

    High blood alcohol levels are a major problem among motorcycle operators

    Half of the fatalities are related to negotiating a curve prior to the crash

    Over 80 percent of the fatalities occur off roadway

    Undivided roadways account for a majority of the fatalities

    Almost two thirds of the fatalities were associated with speeding as an operator contributing factor in the crash

    Almost 60 percent of motorcyclist fatalities occur at night

    Collision with a fixed object is a significant factor in over half of the fatalities

    Braking and steering maneuvers possibly contribute for almost 25 percent of the fatalities

    More riders age 40 and over are getting killed

    Almost one third of the fatally injured operators did not have a proper license

    1998 Motorcycle Accident Statistics:
    2,284 motorcyclists died and approximately 49,000 were injured in highway crashes in the United States.

    Per mile traveled in 1998, a motorcyclist is approximately 16 times more likely to die in a crash than an automobile occupant. And 3x (times) as likely to be injured.

    Head injury is a leading cause of death in motorcycle crashes.

    In 1998, 46% of fatally injured motorcycle drivers were not wearing helmets at the time of the crash.

    NHTSA estimates that motorcycle helmets reduce the likelihood of a fatality by 29% in a crash.

    In 1998, 41% of all motorcycle drivers involved in fatal crashes were speeding.

    Nearly one out of five motorcycle drivers (18%) involved in fatal crashes in 1998 was operating with an invalid license at the time of the collision.

    Motorcycle drivers involved in fatal crashes in 1998 had higher intoxication rates than any other type of motor vehicle driver at 31%.

    In 1998, 500 motorcyclists lives were saved due to helmet usage; 307 could have been saved.

  2. Max Cruise said:

    Motorcycle fatalities have doubled in the last nine years.

    See this statement in the second URL below.
    “Like other road users who are urged to protect themselves from injury or death by wearing safety belts, driving unimpaired, and observing traffic rules, many motorcycle deaths could be prevented if motorcyclists would take responsibility for ensuring they have done everything possible to make the ride safe by taking operator training, wearing protective gear, and riding sober.”
    Law or not, not wearing a helmet and other safety gear in not be a responsible operator of a motor vehicle. My riding jacket and boots helped to protect my shoulder, arm, and toes in my one and only road crash. My knee is still healing from a case of road rash due to not wearing riding pants. That was about 3-1/2 weeks ago.

    See third URL below for this statement.
    “In 2006 motorcycle helmets saved 1,658 lives. NHTSA says that if all motorcyclists had worn helmets, 752 more lives would have been saved. Helmets are estimated to be 37 percent effective in preventing fatal injuries.”
    Hope this will useful to you.
    Max

  3. Bad Company said:

    what a bunch of lies and crap.

    Well trained riders can ride for years without a helmet.

    go to the A.B.A.T.E. website they have stats on all kinds of good stuff.

    Only thing mandatory helmet laws are good for, are the helmet companies, and the politicians they give money to.

  4. Firecracker said:

    Roughly the same as those you get when you compare horses to mass transit.

    To make an honest comparison of anything you have to only have one element on each aside of the equation. Adding variables screws up the math.

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